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Design & Technology

KS3 Curriculum

During years 7 and 8 all students have Design & Technology included on their timetable. At KS3 they have four hours per fortnight which is split to ensure that they get a comprehensive experience of each aspect of the subject prior to choosing their GCSE options, and includes the following:

Design & Technology: A carousel which comprises of 2 hours per fortnight covering a different project per term - Graphics/Drawing skills, Resistant Materials (including workshop Health & Safety) and Engineering/Electronics, this is in addition to one hour a fortnight each of Textiles and Food & Nutrition.  

 

Design and Technology

Year 7 enables pupils to play a constructive role in our technological society; it provides opportunities for them to develop their capability through combining their designing and making skills, with knowledge and understanding in order to create quality products. Pupils follow a programme allowing them to learn about the basics of design and communication. They also make products out of the resistant materials using a variety of techniques such as joining and finishing. Testing and evaluation are key skills developed during the course. ICT skills are developed and used throughout.

Year 8 enables pupils to build on the skills learnt in year 7 and learn further skills in the areas of Product Design, Graphic Products and Engineering. They will use resistant materials when designing and making cast jewellery in their Product Design project. In the Graphic Products project students, after researching famous designers, design and make a ‘Point of Sale display stand’ using Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacture. In their Engineering project students learn about structures and forces, sustainable energy sources as well as designing and building solutions for towers and bridges.

 

Textiles Technology

Year 7 pupils start off learning basic skills of putting fabric together which includes tacking/running stitch and backstitch by hand. They also learn a number of embellishment techniques to help create a variety of samples which they will use in year 8 on products of their choice. At the end of this year, once the samples have been made, the students will work on a design brief in order to create final designs. Some of the techniques and materials they use are Angelina fibres, stencilling, bondaweb, collage and applique, embroidery, weaving and felting.

Year 8 enables pupils to build on the skills they learnt in year 7 and work on a design and make task to produce a product for an identified client.  This project is based on construction, embellishment and hand-embroidery techniques. The students work on their products, choosing techniques and skills that suit their abilities and then progress to creating more advanced work.

 

Food & Nutrition

Year 7 pupils are taught basic health and safety practices, food hygiene and making processes based on select and use. All pupils will learn to cook a wide variety of healthy, sweet and savoury dishes with multicultural influences. They will become competent in a range of cooking techniques including how to adapt recipes and learn to use an awareness of taste, texture and aroma effectively. Pupils are taught to understand where food comes from, and the importance of using foods in season, as well as becoming familiar with a broad range of ingredients and their functions.

Year 8 pupils work on a variety of food related tasks including making more advanced practical products. New skills and knowledge are introduced such as risk assessment, product analysis, disassembly, nutritional problem solving and systems and control. All pupils carry out a design and make task, based on their understanding of nutrition and the identified needs of a selected client or target group.

KS4 Curriculum

Option choices selected to start teaching in year 9. A single choice from the following:

GCSE Engineering

Design & Technology – Graphic Products (Papers & Boards)

Design & Technology – Textiles

Food & Nutrition

 

During year 9 students will begin to specialise in their chosen material areas more closely whilst ensuring the necessary CORE elements are also covered in detail. They will practice a wide range of practical skills as well as learning what they need to include and how to produce and present their ‘coursework’ (NEA).

 

GCSE Engineering - AQA

The sky’s the limit’. Engineering is an increasingly innovative and exciting area to work in. It affects every aspect of modern life – from skyscrapers to smart phones, cars to carrier bags. This GCSE introduces students to a host of new technologies, helping them to gain practical skills and understanding to inspire a lifelong interest in engineering. It will particularly appeal to those who enjoy being creative, with an affinity for drawing, design, maths and problem-solving.

 

The subject content is split into six sections:

Engineering materials                                         Testing & evaluating

Engineering manufacturing processes                   The impact of modern technologies

Systems                                                            Practical Engineering skills

 

Students must also demonstrate mathematical knowledge and understanding, in relation to engineering.

 

Unit 1: Written examination - Content: Sections 1–6 from the subject content. Some questions in the written exam will relate to practical contexts and students will need to apply their understanding within these contexts. There is a mixture of question styles, giving all students the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding.

 

Unit 2: Non-examined Assessment - Practical

Students will undertake a single ‘design and make’ activity, which will arise from investigating a brief set by AQA. The brief will comprise a broad context and three examples of how the brief might be fulfilled. This component will consist of a working prototype and a concise portfolio including sector-specific drawings and an evaluation of their product. The portfolio will consist of an investigation into a context; analysis of the problem; relevant research to formulate a range of methods of solving the problem (including modelling); systems diagrams and sector-specific drawings; a final prototype that is fit for purpose, a test plan and a final evaluation. Students are encouraged to investigate, analyse and evaluate throughout the portfolio and evidence all decisions made.

 

Assessment:

60% Written examination – 1 paper lasting 2 hours

40% NEA - Non-examined Assessment – (Practical/ Coursework)

 

 

GCSE Design & Technology – Graphic Products (Papers & Boards) - Pearson Edexcel

                               

‘This course begins by focussing on the ‘Core’ elements of Design & Technology, ensuring that students are aware of the key factors involved in the subject, then continues by specialising on a specific material category. The students will carry out a number of projects and ‘Focussed Practical Tasks’ extending on their learning, knowledge and skills within their material option.’

 

The GCSE in ‘Graphic Products’ enables students to understand and apply design processes through which they explore, create and evaluate a range of outcomes. The qualification enables students to use creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. It gives students opportunities to apply knowledge from other disciplines, including mathematics, science, art and design, computing and the humanities.

Students will acquire subject knowledge in Design & Technology that builds on KS3, incorporating knowledge and understanding of different materials and manufacturing processes in order to design and make, with confidence, prototypes in response to issues, needs, problems and opportunities. Students will learn how to take design risks, helping them to become resourceful, innovative and enterprising citizens. Students should develop and understanding of the impact on daily life of the wider world and understand that high quality design and technology is important to the creativity, culture, sustainability, wealth and wellbeing of the nation and the global community.

 

What do I study?

The ‘Graphic Products’ course comprises of two units of study:-

Component 1: Written examination – 1 hour 45mins, worth 50% of the qualification

The paper consists of two sections. Section A is assessed on the Core content and Section B on the material category the student has chosen (Papers & Boards). Both sections contain a mixture of different question styles, including open-response, graphical, calculation and extended-open-response questions. Calculators may be used in the examination. Section A is 40 marks and contains 10 marks worth of calculation questions. Section B is 60 marks and contains 5 marks worth of calculation questions.

Component 2: Non-examined Assessment, worth 50% of the qualification

Students will undertake a project based on a contextual challenge released by the exam board a year before certification. The project will test students’ skills in investigation, designing, making and evaluating a prototype of a product

 

Are there any extra perks?

As well as completing the work necessary for the course, we aim to incorporate visits to industry to see manufacturing in practice. We like to encourage extra- curricular activities such as the ‘Young Engineers Club’ and ‘Robotics & Programming club’, which leads on to attending exhibitions and STEM competitions both locally and nationally.

 

Should I do this course?

Students who have an interest in general Design & Technology, Graphic Design or Engineering and have the following skills and aptitudes and particular interests will benefit from this course:

• Workshop/ craft skills;

• An aptitude for ICT, particularly CAD;

• A variety of drawing skills, including Technical drawing;

• Are motivated to work independently.

 

The course provides a good foundation for numerous creative careers, which include the following:-

Product Design, Design Engineering, Furniture Design, Graphic Design, Architecture, Interior Design to name but a few….

 

Assessment:

50% Written Examination 1DT0/1B: 1 paper lasting 1 hour 45 minutes

50% NEA 1DT0/02: Non-examined Assessment - (Coursework)

 

 

 

Design & Technology – Textiles- Pearson Edexcel

 

‘This course begins by focussing on the ‘Core’ elements of Design & Technology, ensuring that students are aware of the key factors involved in the subject, then continues by specialising on a specific material category. The students will carry out a number of projects and ‘Focussed Practical Tasks’ extending on their learning, knowledge and skills within their material option.’

 

The GCSE in ‘D&T: Textiles’ enables students to understand and apply design processes through which they explore, create and evaluate a range of outcomes. The qualification enables students to use creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. It gives students opportunities to apply knowledge from other disciplines, including mathematics, science, art and design, computing and the humanities.

 

Students will acquire subject knowledge in D&T that builds on KS3, incorporating knowledge and understanding of different materials and manufacturing processes in order to design and make, with confidence, prototypes in response to issues, needs, problems and opportunities. Students will learn how to take design risks, helping them to become resourceful, innovative and enterprising citizens. Students should develop and understanding of the impact on daily life of the wider world and understand that high quality design and technology is important to the creativity, culture, sustainability, wealth and wellbeing of the nation and the global community.

 

What do I study?

The ‘Design & Technology: Textiles course comprises of two units of study:-

 

Component 1: Written examination – 1 hour 45mins, worth 50% of the qualification

The paper consists of two sections. Section A is assessed on the Core content and Section B on the material category the student has chosen (Textiles). Both sections contain a mixture of different question styles, including open-response, graphical, calculation and extended-open-response questions. Calculators may be used in the examination. Section A is 40 marks and contains 10 marks worth of calculation questions. Section B is 60 marks and contains 5 marks worth of calculation questions.

 

Component 2: Non-examined Assessment, worth 50% of the qualification

Students will undertake a project based on a contextual challenge released by the exam board a year before certification. The project will test students’ skills in investigation, designing, making and evaluating a prototype of a product.

 

Are there any extra perks?

As well as completing the work necessary for the course, we aim to provide extra- curricular activities such as learning to knit, crochet and weave. Entering national design competitions is also encouraged and whenever possible we try to incorporate visits to the industry.

 

Should I do this course?

Students who take a creative subject such as Design & Technology learn to train their brains to think creatively, which helps daily life in general. It is not surprising that top universities such as Oxford site creativity as their number two requirement for gaining a place. Fashion, a most creative industry, contributes £21 billion to the UK economy each year and it is a very exciting as well as diverse sector in which to work.  Students will further benefit from this course by learning ICT, computer design skills, drawing skills, as well as textile art, which utilises a vast range of unusual and fascinating materials.

 

The course provides a good foundation for numerous creative careers, such as Fashion design/buying/merchandising/journalism, Product Design, Furniture Design, Graphic Design, Architecture, Interior Design, Teaching, Museum curator and many others.

 

Assessment:

50% Written Examination 1DT0/1E: 1 paper lasting 1 hour 45 minutes

50% NEA 1DT0/02: Non-examined Assessment - (Coursework)

 

 

 

GCSE Food & Nutrition

 

Why choose Food for GCSE?

This new GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition is an exciting and creative course which focuses on practical cooking skills to ensure students develop a thorough understanding of nutrition, food provenance and the working characteristics of food materials. At its heart, this qualification focuses on nurturing students’ practical cookery skills to give them a strong understanding of nutrition.

 

Food preparation skills are integrated into five core topics:

Food, nutrition and health

Food science

Food safety

Food choice

Food provenance.

Upon completion of this course, students will be qualified to go on to further study, or embark on an apprenticeship or full time career in the catering or food industries.

 

Assessments:

Non-examination assessment (coursework) starts in September of year 11 - Easter holidays of year 11

 

Task 1: Food investigation (30 marks)

Students understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients. Practical investigations are a compulsory element of this NEA task.

 

Task 2: Food preparation assessment (70 marks)

Students’ knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task.

Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved.

 

50% of GCSE

 

How is it assessed?

Task 1: Written or electronic report (1,500–2,000 words) including photographic evidence of the practical investigation.

Task 2: Written or electronic portfolio including photographic evidence. Photographic evidence of the three final dishes must be included.

 

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

100 marks

50% of GCSE

Questions

Multiple choice questions (20 marks)

Five questions each with a number of sub questions (80 marks)

  

Are there any extra perks?

You will gain a better knowledge an understanding of food, which is an excellent skill for everyday life.

A Level

A Level Syllabus – Graphic Products/Product Design
Design and Technology: Product Design (2 year linear course) - Edexcel (9DT0)

 

‘Explore, Excite, Excel’

 

‘Studying Product Design: Graphics at this level gives you opportunities to be creative and innovative and offers an excellent progression from GCSE Design and Technology courses. The integration of work related activities and links to the commercial and industrial world are also valuable at this level.’

 

Course requirements: Grade B GCSE in Graphic Products/ Product Design/ Resistant Materials/ Engineering full course or grade A in either short course.

You will need to take responsibility for planning and managing your own work as there is a strong coursework component in this subject requiring independent learning and the ability to communicate with others to enhance research techniques.  The skills that you will develop in planning and management are essential in Higher Education and are highly valued by employers.

 

Year 1 Key Learning: 

Predominantly covering theory content in preparation for the written examination and elements of the non-examined assessment (coursework portfolio). The specification seeks to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of, and skills and application in, designing products, identification of and selection of materials and processes. They will also develop their research, analysis skills as well as focussing on wider issues of design and technology, such as social, moral, ethical and environmental impacts.

 

Year 2 Key Learning:

Will mainly consist of completing Component 2 – the portfolio/ coursework in which students are required to demonstrate creativity and flair when investigating, designing and making products. At this level students are given the opportunity to apply the skills they have acquired and developed throughout this course of study and are required to produce a substantial design, make and evaluate project which consists of a portfolio and a prototype.

 

The A Level specification consists of the following:

Component 1: Principles of Design and Technology

Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes; 50% of the qualification; 120 marks

 

Component 2: Independent Design and Make Project

Non-examined assessment; 50% of the qualification; 120 marks

 

Progression

Students can progress from this qualification to:

  • Tertiary education and/or work-based study including product design, engineering and Architecture
  • Further training in the design, creative, engineering and/or manufacturing industries
  • Employment in a relevant sector.

 

Into the Future: An A Level in Product Design: Graphic Products can lead to many opportunities in Higher Education and careers in industry such as: Graphic Design, Computer Graphics, Art and Design and many other areas requiring creativity, CAD/CAM and communicative skills.

 

Other A Level subjects that will complement this course are Mathematics, the Sciences, Art and Design, or it is a suitable contrast with English, History, Geography and Modern Foreign Languages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyond the Classroom

Design & Technology and Engineering

Year 8 & 9:

Young Engineers Club

Engineering Club (TBC)

CSES STEM competition

Big Bang – STEM competition

Bronze CREST Awards

Silver CREST Awards

 

Year 11 - Arkwright Scholarships applications

 

A Level Graphics trip – New Designers, London

 

Workshops are open at lunchtimes to different year groups and clubs to work on individual projects/ catch-up sessions and group/club tasks – schedule will be published at start of term

 

Food

Year 8 & 9:

Creative Cookery Club

 

Textiles

Year 7 & 8:

Knit & Natter Club

Links to useful sites

Gallery

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